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Research 

Research is an integral component of music therapy as an evidence-based contemporary profession and discipline. In addition to exploring and demonstrating the impact of music therapy and ensuring high standards of practice, research evidence informs funding and policy making decisions in the field.

UK music therapists have been and continue to be integral in the development of regional and international research initiatives and collaborations, as well as in the provision of education within research active environments.

As part of its aim to promote the art and science of music therapy, BAMT supports and develops further research in music therapy. In particular BAMT aims:

  • to promote current research activity and participation in research to both music therapists and public;
  • to provide opportunities for music therapists to develop and share research ideas and skills;
  • to enable small-scale research to happen through funding and to promote opportunities for larger funding;
  • to increase awareness of current and emerging research evidence through links with stakeholders on national and international levels.

Research Work Areas

BAMT’s research agenda is currently implemented through four main research work areas
  • Resources
  • Network
  • Funding
  • Collaborations

The BAMT Research Officer represents and advises the association in research-related matters. They can be contacted at info@bamt.org


Resources
  • The BAMT Register of Surveys, Research and Evaluation Projects (ROSREP) provides information about music therapy research activity within the UK. It also enables researchers to recruit participants for ongoing studies.
  • Other online research-related resources are listed on BAMT’s website, including the index and abstracts to the association’s peer-reviewed journal The British Journal of Music Therapy.
  • The BAMT monthly e-bulletin keeps membership up to date with ongoing research activities and news.
  • Access to the BAMT mailing list for sample recruitment purposes is offered to research organisations or individuals who conduct research at a professional or doctorate level. Project registration to ROSREP is a prerequisite for mailing list access.
Network
  • The BAMT Research Network provides a forum for sharing ideas, information and resources. Welcoming both experienced and novice researchers. The network provides opportunities for supporting and/or mentoring those seeking advice or guidance in research in its many guises.
  • In addition to meetings and CPD events, the Research Network members receive research-related news through the network’s mailing list.
Funding
  • BAMT’s Small Grants Scheme supports training and research in music therapy.
  • Other funding opportunities, such as grants from the Music Therapy Charity, are circulated through the BAMT’s e-bulletin.
Collaborations
  • BAMT is a member of The Music Research Consortium UK (MRC-UK) which represents UK professional organisations promoting research in music.
  • BAMT is a member of the Council for Allied Health Professions Research (CAHPR) (previously Allied Health Professions Research Network, AHPRN) which develops AHP research, strengthens evidence of value and impact, and enhances patient care. BAMT members can access the CAHPR research hubs across the country to seek research advice as well as to attend CPD research events. 
  • BAMT is open to be part of research collaborations in areas that are directly connected to the association’s charitable aims. Proposals can be sent to info@bamt.org

“Music and creative arts therapists’ perspectives and practices in working with individuals affected by addictions.”
You are invited to participate in student master’s research at UWE (University of the West of England), Bristol.

The research project focuses on music and creative arts therapists’ experiences working with individuals affected by addiction. The stu

dy will explore how the therapists relate to the addiction itself and how the media of music and/ or creative arts is used in working with the clients who experience addiction as well as the clients that are co-dependent. The research will further investigate the musical, artistic, emotional, psychodynamic, and social aspects that could work as a guide for newly qualified therapist

s and therapists about to commence working with individuals affected by addiction.

Finally, I would like to understand how/ if music therapists and other creative arts therapists cooperate while working with this group of clients. Thus, I invite you to take part in the research!

This would involve completing an online, qualitative survey (where you write the answers to questions in your own words, rather than ticking boxes), and where you will be asked about the above topics.
The data provided will be entirely anonymous.

Who can participate?

Anyone over the age of 18 who is either:
•          current music therapy and/ or another creative arts therapy* trainee in the United Kingdom (UK) (with at least one year of experience in clinical work),
•          current music therapy and/ or another creative arts therapy* trainee outside of the UK (with at least one year of experience in clinical work),
•          qualified music therapist and/ or another creative arts therapist* practicing in the UK,
•          qualified music therapist and/ or another creative arts therapist* practicing outside of the UK.

If you are interested in participating in the research, you will be sent ‘Participant Information’, followed by the link to the survey, containing a ‘Consent clause’.

For any queries related to the research project please contact the student researcher Dorota Kozub at dorota2.kozub@live.uwe.ac.uk.

Thank you!

 

 

 “Songwriting as a therapeutic tool: An exploration into the practical applications and perceived possible outcomes of its use in mental health settings.”  

My name is Marian O’Brien and I am a second-year MA Music Therapy student at the University of Limerick. I am conducting a MA research project titled “Songwriting as a therapeutic tool: An exploration into the practical applications and perceived possible outcomes of its use in mental health settings.”  
 
I am inviting music therapists from the UK  who have used or are using songwriting in mental health settings with adults to take part in this study. The purpose of this study is to gain insight into songwriting, how it is practically used as a therapeutic tool, and its perceived outcomes in mental health settings. The study explores how  song-writing as a therapeutic tool in music therapy is adapted when it is provided through telehealth so  experience using song-writing through telehealth is essential.  The study involves taking part in a 20-30  minute online interview about your experience in using songwriting with service users in any mental health setting. You can find out more about this study from the attached information letter. If you would like to participate in this study, or have any questions about the research, please contact me at 21095019@studentmail.ul.ie.   

Many thanks, Marian

 

 

 How do music therapists consider the relationship between disability studies and music therapy when working with young people with learning disabilities? 

My name is Fizz Margereson and I am studying for a masters in Music Therapy at Anglia Ruskin University. 

I acknowledge and understand that there is a tension between disability studies and music therapy. I want to investigate how the two can work together and what the benefits might be. I will be exploring whether the word therapy is appropriate in some of these cases. Through the discussion, I want to explore different ways of making music whilst thinking about empowerment and power dynamics. 

As part of my research I’d like to interview two music therapists who identify as disabled to have this discussion. 

The interview will be framed more casually as an informal conversation. 

Please let me know if you’re interested by getting in touch via email: fclm101@student.aru.ac.uk 

Thank you! 

 

 

 An exploration of experiences of supervision from a person from another discipline whilst training to be a music therapist 

Participants needed for a postgraduate, qualitative research project focusing on music therapy trainees' experiences of supervision from another discipline. The researcher is looking to recruit participants who are music therapists who have qualified in the last five years and have experienced supervision from another discipline during their training. Participants also need to be over the age of 18 and HCPC registered to take part. 

The research is being completed by Claire Hamlen, a postgraduate Music Therapy student completing a Music Therapy dissertation project at the University of the West of England in Bristol. The research is being supervised by Dr Catherine Warner. 

Participants will firstly be required to complete a short online consent form and demographic survey (see link below) before being contacted to participate in a virtual interview using MS Teams. The questions will cover your experiences of supervision from another discipline during your training. The interviews should last for approximately 1 hour, but there is no fixed time limit. 

If you are interested in participating in the research, please follow the link below to fill out a short consent and demographics survey https://uwe.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_82M8atQsLHmZpgq 

 

 

Exploring Music Therapy for the treatment of adolescents with diagnosed eating disorders
A study exploring music therapy for the treatment of adolescents with diagnosed eating disorders in the UK and Ireland is being undertaken at the University of Limerick. Music therapists from each region of the UK and Ireland (England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, and the Republic of Ireland) are invited to participate in online interviews to discuss their respective practices. 

Participants must meet the following criteria: 
Have a minimum of 1 years’ experience working with adolescents with eating disorders in the UK or Ireland in a clinical setting
Be registered with either BAMT or IACAT 
Currently practising as a music therapist  

If you would like to participate in this study, please email researcher Aoife O’Reilly (20127499@studentmail.ul.ie)  before 30th January 2023, for an interview in January or February 2023. Please include details of the country you currently practice in and a brief overview of your experience working with adolescents with eating disorders as a music therapist.

 

 

 State of the Nation - digital technologies in health and care education

I am currently working with Health Education England on the State of the Nation report – a review into the role of digital technologies within health and care education across England.
  
The State of the Nation report will cover undergraduate and pre-registration education, for all professions, with a focus on:
 
Digital technologies currently in use
The digital literacy and digital technologies within curricula and teaching
The specialist and technical skills needed by faculty staff (clinical and academic).
 
Participants can share their experiences and views by answering our survey before Friday 20 January.
 
We will also be holding two focus groups in February, which anyone can express an interest for through this form.
 
Best wishes,
Jess

Jess Bishop
jessica.bishop11@nhs.net
Programme and Project Support Officer
Communications and Engagement
NHS South, Central and West 

 

 

 Music therapy and the possibility of it being used as a toolkit for primary school classes

I am a 4th year student studying Popular Music at Edinburgh Napier and I am writing my final dissertation on music therapy and the possibility of it being used as a toolkit for primary school classes (not for untrained teachers to use it or for a therapist to go into schools, merely the possible chance of certain methods and music based skills being used to improve kids learning, with a focus on kids on the Autistic Spectrum Disorder). 

Please contact me on the email below if you are available for a short interview? It would take 40 mins roughly and would be several questions purely on opinion based answers. 

Many thanks 
Eva More 
40346249@live.napier.ac.uk

 

 

 Exploring how music therapists work with non-verbal adults who don’t interact by playing music or singing during the therapy sessions

My name is Caterina Dellabona, and I am a final year studying MA Music Therapy at Anglia Ruskin University. 

I am seeking participants to interview for my final major research project. My research aims to explore how music therapists work with non-verbal adults who don’t interact by playing music or singing during the therapy sessions. What can you, as a therapist, do when your client doesn’t appear to communicate with you? How can you best support them? 

I am specifically looking for music therapists who have been in these scenarios with adults with acquired brain injury, but am also interested to hear from music therapists working with adults in different settings too. 

If you have worked with non-verbal adults who don't interact by playing music or singing and are interested in sharing your experiences,  please get in touch by emailing: cd887@student.aru.ac.uk

The interviews will take place online.
Kind regards,
Caterina Dellabona

 

 

 “Is it meaningful? - An exploration of the therapist's process in music therapy with people with profound and multiple learning disabilities.” - Call for Participants

My name is Queenie (Kuan-Yu Tung). I am a year two music therapy student studying at Anglia Ruskin University. I am looking for music therapists who have experience working with people with PMLD (profound and multiple learning disabilities) to be my interviewees for my major project. The title for the major project “Is it meaningful? -An exploration of the therapist's process in music therapy with people with profound and multiple learning disabilities.” I will focus on how the music therapist understands this client group during sessions. If you have experience of working with people with profound and multiple learning disabilities and are interested in participating in an interview to share your experiences, please contact me on: kt574@student.aru.ac.uk

A National survey of Qualified Music Therapists working within NHS care settings for older people, across the UK 
This is an invitation to take part in a survey, open to all music therapists in the UK who work with older people in NHS settings.  

There will also be the option to enter a prize draw for a smart speaker, on completion of the study. 

Purpose 
There is a lack of research specific to music therapy in NHS care settings for older people and we do not have a clear picture of where and how music therapists work in these settings and the impact of their work on the care teams within which they are employed.     

A National survey of HCPC Registered Music Therapists, will serve as a mapping exercise to provide important baseline information on the implementation of music therapy and its impact on staff in NHS care settings for older people. 

This survey will inform a future research study of NHS care settings for older people, where music therapists are employed. 

If you would like to take part in this survey please click on the link below. Full participant information is provided: 

https://canterbury.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/national-survey-of-music-therapists-working-in-nhs-care-se-4 

As well as the prize draw, participants can also register their interest in taking part in a future research study.  

The closing date is: Friday 24th Feb 2023 at 23:58 

Thank you for your consideration, if you have any questions about the survey I would love to hear from you. 
 
Iain Spink  
Music Therapist  
HCPC Registered: AS10146 
i.n.spink129@canterbury.ac.uk
Canterbury Christ Church University  

 

 

 Folk for all Folk; Interviewee Recruitment Notice for Music Therapists who use Folk Music in their practice

Calling all folk music enthusiasts! I am a second-year MA student at ARU looking to interview two music therapists who specialise in or use folk music within their therapy sessions.

Do you believe that folk music is a useful tool within a music therapy session? Have you ever experienced a feeling of connectivity within either one-to-one or group sessions, when using folk music? Does folk music stand out to you as a genre that can build connections? If so, I would love to listen to your experiences.

My name is Helena Britten, and I am in my second year at Anglia Ruskin University. I am writing my dissertation on the effectiveness of folk music within the music therapy room and a section of my research is going to be conducted by interviewing both music therapists and musicians. I will be focussing on both negative and positive experiences to help give me a rounded understanding of the effect of folk music in the music therapy room.

Interviews can be either online or in person and are aimed to be held from late January to early February and am aiming for the interviews to last for roughly an hour. If you feel you have stories to share from your own clinical experiences or have any further questions then please do get in touch.
Email:  hkb116@student.aru.ac.uk
Phone; 07734833896
Looking forward to hearing from you!
All the best,
Helena Britten