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Research 

Research is an integral component of music therapy as an evidence-based contemporary profession and discipline. In addition to exploring and demonstrating the impact of music therapy and ensuring high standards of practice, research evidence informs funding and policy making decisions in the field.

UK music therapists have been and continue to be integral in the development of regional and international research initiatives and collaborations, as well as in the provision of education within research active environments.

As part of its aim to promote the art and science of music therapy, BAMT supports and develops further research in music therapy. In particular BAMT aims:

  • to promote current research activity and participation in research to both music therapists and public;
  • to provide opportunities for music therapists to develop and share research ideas and skills;
  • to enable small-scale research to happen through funding and to promote opportunities for larger funding;
  • to increase awareness of current and emerging research evidence through links with stakeholders on national and international levels.

Research Work Areas

BAMT’s research agenda is currently implemented through four main research work areas
  • Resources
  • Network
  • Funding
  • Collaborations

The BAMT Research Officer represents and advises the association in research-related matters. They can be contacted at info@bamt.org


Resources
  • The BAMT Register of Surveys, Research and Evaluation Projects (ROSREP) provides information about music therapy research activity within the UK. It also enables researchers to recruit participants for ongoing studies.
  • Other online research-related resources are listed on BAMT’s website, including the index and abstracts to the association’s peer-reviewed journal The British Journal of Music Therapy.
  • The BAMT monthly e-bulletin keeps membership up to date with ongoing research activities and news.
  • Access to the BAMT mailing list for sample recruitment purposes is offered to research organisations or individuals who conduct research at a professional or doctorate level. Project registration to ROSREP is a prerequisite for mailing list access.
Network
  • The BAMT Research Network provides a forum for sharing ideas, information and resources. Welcoming both experienced and novice researchers. The network provides opportunities for supporting and/or mentoring those seeking advice or guidance in research in its many guises.
  • In addition to meetings and CPD events, the Research Network members receive research-related news through the network’s mailing list.
Funding
  • BAMT’s Small Grants Scheme supports training and research in music therapy.
  • Other funding opportunities, such as grants from the Music Therapy Charity, are circulated through the BAMT’s e-bulletin.
Collaborations
  • BAMT is a member of The Music Research Consortium UK (MRC-UK) which represents UK professional organisations promoting research in music.
  • BAMT is a member of the Council for Allied Health Professions Research (CAHPR) (previously Allied Health Professions Research Network, AHPRN) which develops AHP research, strengthens evidence of value and impact, and enhances patient care. BAMT members can access the CAHPR research hubs across the country to seek research advice as well as to attend CPD research events. 
  • BAMT is open to be part of research collaborations in areas that are directly connected to the association’s charitable aims. Proposals can be sent to info@bamt.org

Call For Participants 

 

YEAR 3 MUSIC THERAPY TRAINEE - ROEHAMPTON

QUALITATIVE RESEARCH PROJECT EXPLORING HOW SEXUAL IDENTITY MIGHT IMPACT A MUSIC THERAPIST'S RELATIONSHIP WITH THEIR MUSICAL INSTRUMENT

My name is Joshua Considine. I am a final-year music therapy student at Roehampton University. I am seeking 3 participants for a qualitative research project exploring how sexual identity might impact a music therapist’s relationship with their musical instrument. The project is born out of my own experiences as a queer trainee music therapist, and I wish to explore the experiences of others working in the profession. My research question is: 

 
“What might LGBTIQA+ music therapists consider to be the impact of their sexual identity on their relationship with their preferred instrument in clinical work?”   
 
The research will be conducted using semi-structured, private interviews lasting approximately 1 hour. Interviews will take place in late April/ May, either online or face-to-face at a time and location convenient to participants. 
 
If you are interested in sharing your expertise and contributing to this project, please be in touch for more information via email: considij@roehampton.ac.uk.  
 
Closing date: 14th April. 
 
Thank you very much.

 

 

 

MUSIC THERAPY TRAINEE - ROEHAMPTON

BY WHOSE CONSENT? INVESTIGATING MUSIC THERAPISTS’ EXPERIENCES OF THE CONSENT PROCESS IN PAEDIATRIC PALLIATIVE CARE
Hello, my name is Peter Austin, and I am a final-year MA Music Therapy student at the University of Roehampton. For my research dissertation, I am investigating the ways in which music therapists working in paediatric palliative care settings experience the consent process with children who have complex needs.


I am looking to interview three music therapists who have 3+ years’ current or recent experience of delivering music therapy in children’s hospices. Importantly, participants should have experience in delivering single-session interventions for children staying at hospices on a short-break basis. The recorded interviews will last for approximately 1 hour and be conducted during April and
early-May 2023. The interviews will be in-person and take place at a private and mutually agreed location.


If you are interested in taking part in this study and would like further information, please contact Peter Austin: austinp@roehampton.ac.uk by Friday 14th April.

 

Please feel free to share with other music therapists who may be interested.


Thank you, Peter Austin

 

 

 

MUSIC THERAPY TRAINEE - GSMD

‘Exploring how the lived experiences of dyslexic music therapists can inform and influence aspects of their clinical practice’

This project is open to qualified and trainee music therapists with either a formal diagnosis of dyslexia as well as those identifying as dyslexic. Participants will be invited to explore and reflect on their experiences of dyslexia, the meanings they draw from them, and how these might influence aspects of their clinical practice. This could include, but is not limited to, their theoretical approach, the clients they choose to work with, or the musical aspects of their clinical practice. Through its findings this research aims to shift the narrative beyond dyslexia the disability or deficit, alternatively embracing a framework that acknowledges how a diversity of lived experiences of dyslexic music therapists can influence their clinical practice.

Participation in the research involves taking part in one interview lasting approximately 60 minutes. This shall be conducted either in person or online at a time, location, and via a medium agreed between the parties involved.

If you wish to express your interest in taking part, or want to find out more information, please contact Jonny Janecki at jonny.janecki@stu.gsmd.ac.uk

 

 

 

MUSIC THERAPY STUDENT - UWE

“That Song Is Me!”

Music therapists are invited to take part in a Masters research project seeking perspectives on how to work with clients with personality disorder diagnoses who self-identify with a piece of music.

Participants must be qualified music therapists who are working, or who have worked with, clients living with personality disorder diagnoses. Through exploring music therapists’ perspectives of musical self-identification when working with a client group who frequently experience issues of the self and identity, this project hopes to find common themes and highlight practical insights that may be useful in helping this client group.


The research participants will be invited to take part in one individual interview which will be carried out by the Masters student. The interview will involve discussion of the participant’s perception of how musical self-identification by the client can be explored and used therapeutically to help the client. If you are interested in participating or would like more information please contact me via e-mail: Adrian Keefe (adrian2.keefe@live.uwe.ac.uk), or alternatively my research supervisor Dr Catherine Warner (catherine.warner@uwe.ac.uk).

 

 

 

MUSIC THERAPY TRAINEE - UWE

Participants wanted for research on perceptions of Music Therapists and the LGBTQIA+ Community

You don’t need to know what music therapy is or have any experience of music therapy to take part in this study!

I am seeking two distinct groups of participants:

Qualified and trainee music therapists
People who identify as LGBTQIA+ and are aged 18+
(Some people may be members of both of these groups)

You will be asked to write two stories about hypothetical scenarios in which a music therapist or a music therapy client is thought to be LGBTQIA+.

For further information and to take part in the study please click on the following link: 

https://uwe.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bK1i7z7SGq7ZuoC

If you have any questions, please contact the researcher:
 
Bethany Mulley bethany2.mulley@live.uwe.ac.uk

 

 

 

MUSIC THERAPY TRAINEE - UWE

Experiences of using musical improvisation with people living with dementia

Calling all Music Therapists, Trainee Music Therapists and Community Music Practitioners!

A trainee music therapist from UWE is conducting research for a final-year dissertation project about experiences of using musical improvisation with people living with dementia.

Participation in the research involves taking part in an online interview via Microsoft Teams, lasting approximately 60 minutes.

To express your interest in taking part, or to find out more information, please contact Chloe Buttery at Chloe2.Buttery@live.uwe.ac.uk

Please feel free to share this information with anyone you know who may be interested!

 

 

MUSIC THERAPY TRAINEE - QMU

An empirical study investigating how the COVID-19 pandemic influenced the work of music therapists who primarily use wind instruments in their practice
"My name is Nadia Plummer, and I am a postgraduate student from the School of Health Sciences at Queen Margaret University in Edinburgh. As part of my degree course, I am undertaking a research project for my Masters dissertation. The title of my project is: An empirical sturdy investigating how the COVID-19 pandemic influenced the work of music therapists who primarily use wind instruments in their practice.

This study will investigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the work music therapists who primarily use wind instruments for their practice in the UK. I will also be researching how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the wider music therapy practice in the UK, as well as investigating the use of wind instruments as resources for music therapy delivery in the UK.

I am looking for volunteers to participate in the project. Such volunteers must be fully qualified music therapists who consider to primarily deliver therapeutic work on a wind instrument (e.g. clarinet, trumpet, oboe, french horn). Music therapists must have been practicing prior to the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. This dissertation research excludes the participation of NHS colleagues as per QMU dissertation guidance. There are no other criteria (e.g. gender, age, or health) for being included or excluded.

If you agree to participate in the study, you will be asked to take part in an interview. The whole procedure should take no longer than 30 minutes."

Contact details of the researcher

Name of researcher: Nadia Elizabeth Plummer

Address: MSc in Music Therapy, School of Health Sciences
Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh
Queen Margaret University Drive
Musselburgh
East Lothian EH21 6UU

Email: 21008181@qmu.ac.uk

 

MUSIC THERAPY TRAINEE - UWE

The experience of trainee and qualified music therapists of colour: A qualitative study of being understood and misunderstood within a cross-cultural supervisory relationship

My name is Rachel, I am a MA Music Therapy student at UWE Bristol. I am currently in my final year and seeking participants for my dissertation.

My dissertation title is “The experience of trainee and qualified music therapists of colour: A qualitative study of being understood and misunderstood within a cross-cultural supervisory relationship.”
The purpose of my research is to gain insight to trainee and qualified music therapists of colour experiences of being misunderstood and/or misunderstood within supervision.

My research involves a qualitative survey for participants to complete.

If you are interested in taking part in the survey, please click on this link https://uwe.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6F0HsvgefsPX6iG, or if you have any questions, please contact me at rachel2.knowles-matthews@live.uwe.ac.uk.

Thank you, Rachel




MUSIC THERAPY TRAINEE - GSMD

Racial and Ethnic Minority Identity within UK Music Therapy Practice
My name is Leah Inman and I am a final year MA Music Therapy student studying at Guildhall School of Music and Drama. I will be conducting a research project on the topic of Racial and Ethnic Minority Identity within UK Music Therapy Practice. I am specifically looking for Music Therapists practicing in the UK who identify as an ethnic minority but also open to participants who do not identify as an ethnic minority. My research will be done through one-to-one semi-structured interviews in the location of your choice.

If you would like to participate in my project, please contact me at: Leah.Inman@stu.gsmd.ac.uk and I will send you further information regarding my project.

Many thanks! Leah Inman"

 

“Music and creative arts therapists’ perspectives and practices in working with individuals affected by addictions.”

You are invited to participate in student master’s research at UWE (University of the West of England), Bristol.

The research project focuses on music and creative arts therapists’ experiences working with individuals affected by addiction. The study will explore how the therapists relate to the addiction itself and how the media of music and/ or creative arts is used in working with the clients who experience addiction as well as the clients that are co-dependent. The research will further investigate the musical, artistic, emotional, psychodynamic, and social aspects that could work as a guide for newly qualified therapist

s and therapists about to commence working with individuals affected by addiction.

Finally, I would like to understand how/ if music therapists and other creative arts therapists cooperate while working with this group of clients. Thus, I invite you to take part in the research!

This would involve completing an online, qualitative survey (where you write the answers to questions in your own words, rather than ticking boxes), and where you will be asked about the above topics.
The data provided will be entirely anonymous.


Who can participate?
Anyone over the age of 18 who is either:
• current music therapy and/ or another creative arts therapy* trainee in the United Kingdom (UK) (with at least one year of experience in clinical work),
• current music therapy and/ or another creative arts therapy* trainee outside of the UK (with at least one year of experience in clinical work),
• qualified music therapist and/ or another creative arts therapist* practicing in the UK,
• qualified music therapist and/ or another creative arts therapist* practicing outside of the UK.

If you are interested in participating in the research, you will be sent ‘Participant Information’, followed by the link to the survey, containing a ‘Consent clause’.

For any queries related to the research project please contact the student researcher Dorota Kozub at dorota2.kozub@live.uwe.ac.uk.

Thank you!

 

MUSIC THERAPY TRAINEE - UNIVERSITY OF LIMERICK

“Songwriting as a therapeutic tool: An exploration into the practical applications and perceived possible outcomes of its use in mental health settings.”
My name is Marian O’Brien and I am a second-year MA Music Therapy student at the University of Limerick. I am conducting a MA research project titled “Songwriting as a therapeutic tool: An exploration into the practical applications and perceived possible outcomes of its use in mental health settings.”

I am inviting music therapists from the UK who have used or are using songwriting in mental health settings with adults to take part in this study. The purpose of this study is to gain insight into songwriting, how it is practically used as a therapeutic tool, and its perceived outcomes in mental health settings. The study explores how song-writing as a therapeutic tool in music therapy is adapted when it is provided through telehealth so experience using song-writing through telehealth is essential. The study involves taking part in a 20-30 minute online interview about your experience in using songwriting with service users in any mental health setting. You can find out more about this study from the attached information letter. If you would like to participate in this study, or have any questions about the research, please contact me at 21095019@studentmail.ul.ie.

Many thanks, Marian



MUSIC THERAPY TRAINEE - ARU

How do music therapists consider the relationship between disability studies and music therapy when working with young people with learning disabilities?
My name is Fizz Margereson and I am studying for a masters in Music Therapy at Anglia Ruskin University.

I acknowledge and understand that there is a tension between disability studies and music therapy. I want to investigate how the two can work together and what the benefits might be. I will be exploring whether the word therapy is appropriate in some of these cases. Through the discussion, I want to explore different ways of making music whilst thinking about empowerment and power dynamics.

As part of my research I’d like to interview two music therapists who identify as disabled to have this discussion.

The interview will be framed more casually as an informal conversation.

Please let me know if you’re interested by getting in touch via email: fclm101@student.aru.ac.uk

Thank you!




MUSIC THERAPY TRAINEE - UWE

An exploration of experiences of supervision from a person from another discipline whilst training to be a music therapist
Participants needed for a postgraduate, qualitative research project focusing on music therapy trainees' experiences of supervision from another discipline. The researcher is looking to recruit participants who are music therapists who have qualified in the last five years and have experienced supervision from another discipline during their training. Participants also need to be over the age of 18 and HCPC registered to take part.

The research is being completed by Claire Hamlen, a postgraduate Music Therapy student completing a Music Therapy dissertation project at the University of the West of England in Bristol. The research is being supervised by Dr Catherine Warner.

Participants will firstly be required to complete a short online consent form and demographic survey (see link below) before being contacted to participate in a virtual interview using MS Teams. The questions will cover your experiences of supervision from another discipline during your training. The interviews should last for approximately 1 hour, but there is no fixed time limit.

If you are interested in participating in the research, please follow the link below to fill out a short consent and demographics survey https://uwe.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_82M8atQsLHmZpgq




MUSIC THERAPY TRAINEE - ARU

Exploring how music therapists work with non-verbal adults who don’t interact by playing music or singing during the therapy sessions
My name is Caterina Dellabona, and I am a final year studying MA Music Therapy at Anglia Ruskin University.

I am seeking participants to interview for my final major research project. My research aims to explore how music therapists work with non-verbal adults who don’t interact by playing music or singing during the therapy sessions. What can you, as a therapist, do when your client doesn’t appear to communicate with you? How can you best support them?

I am specifically looking for music therapists who have been in these scenarios with adults with acquired brain injury, but am also interested to hear from music therapists working with adults in different settings too.

If you have worked with non-verbal adults who don't interact by playing music or singing and are interested in sharing your experiences, please get in touch by emailing: cd887@student.aru.ac.uk

The interviews will take place online.
Kind regards,
Caterina Dellabona

 

MUSIC THERAPY TRAINEE - ARU

 “Is it meaningful? - An exploration of the therapist's process in music therapy with people with profound and multiple learning disabilities.” - Call for Participants

 My name is Queenie (Kuan-Yu Tung). I am a year two music therapy student studying at Anglia Ruskin University. I am looking for music therapists who have experience working with people with PMLD (profound and multiple learning disabilities) to be my interviewees for my major project. The title for the major project “Is it meaningful? -An exploration of the therapist's process in music therapy with people with profound and multiple learning disabilities.” I will focus on how the music therapist understands this client group during sessions. If you have experience of working with people with profound and multiple learning disabilities and are interested in participating in an interview to share your experiences, please contact me on: kt574@student.aru.ac.uk

 

The role of community music therapy in establishing/maintaining identity as well as the impact it has on our sense of belonging in the wider social collective, Student, University of Glasgow

My name is Sara Takhtechian and I am a medical student at the University of Glasgow who is currently undertaking an intercalated degree within the field of Medical Humanities, for which we have to write a dissertation. As an individual who has always been fascinated by the role of music in society and health, I found myself drawn to investigating the role of community music therapy in establishing/maintaining identity as well as the impact it has on our sense of belonging in the wider social collective. Combined with my passion for refugee health and well-being, I became fascinated by the extent to which this is (and could potentially be) applied to the refugee population of Glasgow, particularly by utilising culture-specific music.


Despite research surrounding identity/sense-of-belonging exists in the context of other demographics, I found similar research sparse in the context of refugee populations. To gather data around this, I thought it would be incredibly insightful to have the chance to directly interview music therapists in Glasgow and combine this with national/global adjacent research on culture-informed music therapy and sociological/geographical theory surrounding identity and belonging on one's wellbeing. With increasing tension regarding public and government attitudes towards refugees in the UK, I believe that this research would potentially have the power to highlight a therapeutic gap and aid in implementing this practice locally to contribute towards the wellbeing of the refugee populations of Glasgow.

The interview would last around 30 minutes and can either be conducted on campus at the University of Glasgow in a secure and confidential setting or can be conducted over Zoom, depending on your own preference. I am also more than happy send over the participant information sheet which will contain more in-depth information surrounding the interview and what it will constitute, as well as the questions beforehand if any music therapists would prefer to see this before agreeing.

I am best contacted via this email: 2435715T@student.gla.ac.uk or my phone number: 07786947202

 

Thank you so much in advance.


Best regards,
Sara Takhtechian

 


Music therapy and the possibility of it being used as a toolkit for primary school classes
I am a 4th year student studying Popular Music at Edinburgh Napier and I am writing my final dissertation on music therapy and the possibility of it being used as a toolkit for primary school classes (not for untrained teachers to use it or for a therapist to go into schools, merely the possible chance of certain methods and music based skills being used to improve kids learning, with a focus on kids on the Autistic Spectrum Disorder).

Please contact me on the email below if you are available for a short interview? It would take 40 mins roughly and would be several questions purely on opinion based answers.

Many thanks
Eva More
40346249@live.napier.ac.uk

 

Do you or your team regularly carry out the CORE-LD as part of your routine practice with patients?
Rationale: There are currently no published client norms for the Clinical Outcome in Routine Evaluation-Learning Disabilities scale (CORE-LD), an easy-read self-report evaluation tool for individuals with learning disabilities which looks at mood (e.g., have you felt sad about people you have lost?, Have you felt unhappy?), functioning (e.g., have you found it hard to say how you feel?, have you had difficulty getting to sleep?), and risk (e.g., have you bottled up
angry feelings?, have you hurt yourself on purpose?, Have you had thoughts about ending your life?).

I have recently been awarded an NHS funded internship to carry out a project involving the retrospective analysis of CORE-LD data in both inpatient and community Learning Disability settings within my NHS trust, and where possible, with data gathered from other NHS trusts and organisations nationally where the tool has been used in routine pre and post intervention data collection.

I am looking to collect anonymised data* from a range of community and inpatient settings nationally, with an aim to establishing clinical norms for this tool. This would be a step towards validating the tool for use in various settings allowing us to compare clinical norms to individual patient scores to monitor mental health, progress, and risks.

If you are interested in getting involved and have any data to contribute, please do get in touch to discuss the data sharing process and requirements: ToniLeigh.Harrison@cntw.nhs.uk

Toni Harrison
Art Psychotherapist
Tel: 01670 394884 (ext. 64884)
Mobile: 07816129616
email: Tonileigh.Harrison@cntw.nhs.uk
web: www.cntw.nhs.uk

 

 

UK State of the Sector Survey – deadline 5pm, Thursday 6 April

This survey is for everyone who is involved in doing, commissioning or supporting creative health work in the UK to help us understand how you work and what your priorities are. We will use your responses to advocate for your work, and provide more helpful resources. Results will also feed into the Creative Health Review being undertaken by the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Arts, Health & Wellbeing.