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In this podcast series, Luke Annesley talks to music therapists and others about music therapy and related topics. 





Music Therapy Conversations - Pauline Etkin OBE

Pauline Etkin trained as a teacher at the Witwatersrand Teachers Training College in Johannesburg, Rep of South Africa. She became head of Music and early childhood didactics and was always interested in how music could help the many children that she came across who were struggling to fit in socially or educationally. Pauline has been a major influence in the development of music therapy both in the UK and internationally. She trained as a music therapist in 1982 and her first passion will always be as a music therapist having worked in this role for 25 years working for a year in South Africa with children with life-threatening illnesses and in Soweto with children and teachers there. In 1986 she returned to London and worked as a music therapist and tutor becoming Sybil’s Deputy Director in 1988. Pauline took over from Sybil Beresford-Peirse as Director of the new Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy Centre in North London in 1991, and then as Chief Executive Officer of Nordoff-Robbins from 2002 to 2013. When Robin Howat, Head of the Post-Graduate Training course moved to Australia, Pauline undertook the additional role of Head of Training from 1993 until 2003, developing it together with her team into a two-year Master of Music Therapy Degree course in 1996 validated by City University.

Pauline became aware of the huge resources of the centre, including its library and conference facilities and made sure that the developing profession in the UK, in addition to therapists working within the Nordoff-Robbins approach, could benefit from such facilities. Conferences and meetings were held regularly at the centre.

Pauline was also instrumental in linking with governmental departments in helping to set-up the formal registration of music therapists in the UK. She served on many national groups, for many years chairing committees on supervision and training and education. The BAMT awarded Pauline a ‘Lifetime Achievement Award’ in 2013 and she was awarded an OBE ‘for services to music therapy’ in the 2013 Queen’s New Year Honours. For more information about Pauline’s extensive career in music therapy see her autobiography in Volume 2 of John Mahoney’s compilation (2017) and the two histories of the evolution of Nordoff-Robbins by Fraser Simspon (2007, 2009).

In this interview Pauline talks about her own experiences of training, with particular reference to Sybil Beresford-Peirse and Clive Robbins. There’s also some discussion on what it might mean, from her perspective, to be a music-centred music therapist, and on the evolution of music therapy in the UK, with tributes paid to the various pioneers identified by Pauline, who have contributed so much to the profession.











Music Therapy Conversations - Dr Philippa Derrington

Philippa Derrington leads the MSc Music Therapy course and is a Senior Lecturer within the Division of Occupational Therapy and Arts Therapies at Queen Margaret University in Edinburgh. She is one of the editors of the British Journal of Music Therapy, and passionate about promoting and developing the music therapy profession through research, practice and teaching.

In this interview, Philippa talks about her music therapy work with adolescents at a social inclusion centre, attached to a mainstream secondary school. Although the work was primarily with young people in the centre, which became The Centre School in 2009 – a school for young people with social, emotional and mental health needs – she developed provision to a full time music therapy post and worked with students across both the mainstream and special schools. Press coverage of this work featured in The Times Educational Supplement and The Guardian.

Philippa also talks about her PhD at Anglia Ruskin University, which set out to investigate the effectiveness of music therapy for young people at risk of underachievement or exclusion, and hereby acknowledges the support and enthusiasm of her supervisors, Amelia Oldfield, Tony Wigram and Helen Odell-Miller, as well as The Music Therapy Charity who funded the three-year study.

Philippa continues to practise as a music therapist in a school for young people with complex social emotional and behavioural needs and since moving to Edinburgh in 2013, has led the MSc Music Therapy course through some major changes. Together with the Head of Division, Brendan McCormack, who is internationally recognised for his person-centred practice development and particular interest in the use of arts and creativity in healthcare research and development, Philippa is incredibly excited about the interdisciplinary potential within the School of Health Sciences and furthering new research opportunities for Music Therapy at QMU.


References
McFerran, K. Derrington, P. and Saarikallio, S. eds. (2019). Handbook of Music, Adolescents, and Wellbeing. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Tomlinson, J. Derrington, P. and Oldfield, A. eds. (2012). Music Therapy in Schools: Working with children of all ages in mainstream and special education. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.











Music Therapy Conversations - Joy Gravestock

Joy is a self-employed music therapist in private practice. Prior to her music therapy training, she was clinical lead for a Nottinghamshire NHS Trust, (in adoption services, CAMHS, Nottinghamshire), having worked previously within the field of adoption for many years. She was also a member of both Nottingham and Leicester County’s Adoption Panels, offering both her professional and personal experiences to panel. Now as a specialist music therapist in adoption practice, Joy is an identified lead therapist for Adoption Services in the East Midlands, as well as retaining links with “CORAM” Leicestershire, and working extensively with individually referred cases funded by the Adoption Support Fund (which came into being in 2015 to enable adoptive families to gain access to psychotherapies). Joy works with adoptive families where longer-term placements are deemed “at risk of breakdown”, when ostensibly difficulties result from the placement of older children who are described as having significant “attachment (and other) disorders”. She also works with families at the beginning of new placements when it is thought likely that traumatic material will impinge upon the adoption placement.

She is currently working with adopted children with complex physical and learning disability, where often a disability discovered at birth led to the relinquishment of a baby. Joy developed her interest in how the impact of findings from neurobiology impacted on adult verbal psychotherapy, and what this might mean for music therapists trying to give meaning to what is emergent in the therapy room.

Her PhD research explores how relational attachments may be enhanced by moments of attunement (which might be explained partially in terms of their neurobiology) occurring within a music therapy relationship. She has written the BAMT literature on adoption which is available to anyone perusing the website with a request about music therapy in adoption. She has presented her work on music therapy, adoption, and the significance of attunement at numerous conferences over the past 5 years, and in 2017 presented at the World Congress Of Music Therapy in Japan and at “EcArte” (the Eurpoean Arts Therapies conference) in Poland. She also regularly presents work to adoption agencies, and consults to groups and service users within the adoption community. She is an author, supervisor, and lecturer at Derby and Nottingham Universities.

Luke talks to Joy about her work with adoption and how this relates to her own life experiences, her development as a music therapist, and her current PhD research.

References.

Bettelheim. B. 1950. Love Is Not Enough. Collier Books Edition Eighth Printing 1969.
Fonagy. P. 2001. Attachment Theory And Psychoanalysis. Karnac.
Verrier.N 1993. The Primal Wound: Understanding The Adopted Child. Gateway Press.

On Music And Psychoanalysis etc.
Ammaniti. M. and Gallese. V. (eds) 2014. The Birth Of Intersubjectivity: Psychodynamics, Neurobiology and The Self. Norton.
Rose. G. J. 2004. Between Couch And Piano: Psychoanalysis, Music, Art and Neuroscience. Routledge.
Searle. Y. and Streng. I. 2001. Where Analysis Meets The Arts: The Intergration Of The Arts Therapies With Psychoanalytic Theory. Karnac.

On Relationality.
Jaenicke. C. 2008. The Risk Of Relatedness: Intersubjectivity Theory In Clinical Practice. Aronson.
Trondalen. G. 2016. Relational Music Therapy: An Intersubjective Perspective. Barcelona Publishers.
Mitchell. S. A. 2000. Relationality: From Attachment To Intersubjectivity. Psychology Press, Taylor and Francis.
..and research..
Finlay. L and Evans. K. (eds) 2009. Relational-centred Research For Psychotherapists: Exploring Meanings and Experience. Wiley-Blackwell.

On Winnicottian Presence.
Wilberg. P. 2013. Being and Listening: Counselling, Psychoanalysis and The Ontology Of Listening. New Yoga Publications.

On Attachment.
Gerhardt. S. 2004. Why Love Matters. Routledge.
Music. G. 2019. Nurturing Children: From Trauma To Growth Using Attachment Theory, Psychoanalysis and Neurobiology. Routledge.

On Wounded Healers.
Kuchuck. S. 2014. Clinical Implications Of The Psychoanalysts Life Experience. Routledge.
This has the chapter referred to in the podcast about an adoptee who describes her lived experience as a therapist with lived experience of adoption.
Rippere. V. and Williams. R. 1985. Wounded Healers: Mental Health Workers Experiences Of Depression. Wiley.
Sedgwick. D. 1994. The Wounded Healer: Countertransference From A Jungian Perspective. Routledge.
…and research…
Romanyshyn. R. 2013. The Wounded researcher: Research With Soul In Mind. Spring Journal

On Micro Moments Of Attunement (or similar!).
Webber. A. 2017. Breakthrough Moments In Arts-Based Psychotherapy. Karnac.

On The Idea Of The Third.
Ogden. T. 1989. The Primitive Edge Of Experience. Aronson.
Benjamin. J. 2018. Beyond Doer and Done To: Recognition Theory, Intersubjectivity, and the Third. Routledge.









Music Therapy Conversations - Bob Heath and Jane Lings

Episode 23 is all about therapeutic songwriting. Luke speaks to Jane Lings and Bob Heath.

Jane Lings works freelance as a music therapist, supervisor, and educator. She has extensive clinical experience in palliative and bereavement care having worked for 15 years in an adult hospice. She has worked in many different clinical areas with children and adults, most recently a successful music therapy pilot project in a women’s prison. She was Senior Lecturer at UWE on the MA music therapy for 14 years and continues as associate lecturer. She is involved in lecturing and running workshops in many contexts
including medical humanities. She runs a community choir and is involved in a regular music session for ex-offenders.

Bob Heath has worked extensively in Palliative and Bereavement care both as a clinician and a lecturer/teacher and also has many years of experience working in Mental Health and Special Educational settings. He has published work in various books and journals and continues to work as a therapist and supervisor in End of Life Care, Community Mental Health and private practice. Bob has presented his work at a wide range of events including The Hay
Literature Festival and Medicine Unboxed and continues to offer and facilitate training courses and workshops for therapists and health care practitioners.

Over the last 15 years Bob and Jane have worked together to help promote the use of therapeutic songwriting in music therapy practice. They continue to develop and offer a range of workshops in the UK and Europe and have recently delivered the UK’s first academic therapeutic songwriting module at The University of The West of England.

Luke speaks to Jane and Bob about their approach to therapeutic songwriting, including their own processes of incorporating these techniques into their music therapy practice. Why did this seem, initially, an unusual, even controversial, way of working, and why does songwriting continue to be somewhat neglected in music therapy practice?









Music Therapy Conversations - Ann Sloboda

Ann Sloboda is Head of Music Therapy at the Guildhall School of Music & Drama. She is a registered psychoanalyst (British Psychoanalytic Council) and music therapist (HCPC). She studied music at Oxford University, and qualified as a music therapist from GSMD in 1985. Between 1985 and 2005 she worked as a music therapist in the NHS, in adult learning disability, eating disorders, general and forensic psychiatry. She has undertaken research in music therapy with PTSD. A past chair of the Association of Professional Music Therapists, she was Head of Arts Therapies at West London Mental Health Trust for 10 years.

In this interview Luke talked to Ann about her personal development as a music therapist and, later, psychoanalyst, as well as about the development of the training course at the Guildhall School. Ann also encouraged Luke to reflect on some of his own experiences as a trainee, which led to some interesting shared reflections on the nature of training, including personal motivations for embarking on a therapeutic career. Ann discussed her own very particular experience of music therapy as a client, with the pioneering analytic music therapist Mary Priestley.









Music Therapy Conversations - Andy Lale

In episode 21 of Music Therapy Conversations Luke Annesley talks to Andy Lale. Andy has worked as a music therapist for twenty years. He has been employed by CNWL NHS Trust, in this capacity, since 1999. He manages a team of arts psychotherapists for South Westminster and specialises in music psychotherapy with psychotic states. His clinical work, with this client group, focuses on transference and insight. His MA dissertation on Countertransference Enactment is available in the Tavistock Library. He has taught on the MA in Music Therapy at Roehampton University and now supervises other clinicians in this compound intervention. He also contributes to the ICAPT evening lecture series. Andy has created a series of online videos explaining the key ideas of this way of working. This study is an attempt to encourage interest more widely, in psychoanalytically informed music psychotherapy, for psychosis. Andy presented this study at the BAMT conference, 2018.

In this interview, Andy talks about the origin of the term 'psychodynamics', and in some detail about how he applies psychodynamic theory to his work as a music psychotherapist with psychotic patients. What is the relationship between music and psychodynamic theory? We also discuss the anti-psychiatry movement, and the difficulties of research and evaluation of music psychotherapy with this client group. And what about 'music psychotherapy' itself? Why is there not yet a well-established post-qualification training in music psychotherapy in the UK?









Music Therapy Conversations - Joanna Eden

Joanna Eden is a jazz singer and singer/songwriter based near Cambridge in the UK. She has shared stages with Jamie Cullum, the Buena Vista Social Club & The Blockheads. She mentored a young Sam Smith for nine years and released her 4th album 'Truth Tree' this October. Joanna's career is all about finding a balance between performing, creating and sharing skills and experience.

In this varied and exploratory conversation we talked about music education, including some of Joanna’s problematic experiences in her own musical upbringing, what it’s like being a singer fronting a band, and her own song writing process.

Jo was a judge on the TV talent show ‘All Together Now’, and she found this a tricky experience for various reasons, which we discuss. She recently took part in a community project for people with dementia, working with music therapists from Anglia Ruskin University, called ‘Together in Sound’. She describes her experience of this project, including how she related to the music therapists, and her perceptions of music therapy as a profession. She also talks about Sam Smith, and what it was like teaching someone who was incredibly motivated right from the start.

You can see Joanna perform at:

  • Cadogan Hall, London 20 November 2018
  • The Other Palace, London 22 November 2018
  • The Stables, MK 29 November 2018
  • Ronnie Scotts, London 2 December 2018
For more dates go to www.joannaeden.net

https://saffronhall.com/togetherinsound/










Music Therapy Conversations - Liz Coombes

Liz Coombes is the course leader of the MA Music Therapy course at the University of South Wales, Newport. Since qualifying as a Music Therapist in 2000 following a BMus degree at Royal Holloway College, University of London, she has specialised in working with children and young people with emotional and behavioural difficulties as well as asylum seekers and refugees. She uses psychodynamic thinking to underpin her work and utilises her considerable experience in community music-making. She has worked on skill-sharing therapeutic music projects since 2009 in Palestine, and in the UK. She has a particular interest in how sharing these skills with non-musicians such as teachers, social workers and carers can enrich their professional practice. She has recently completed her training in Guided Imagery in Music.

We talked about Liz’s experience as a community musician, how this links to her music therapy work, what skills music therapists need to develop in training, and working cross-culturally. 

Coombes, E. (2011, February). Project Bethlehem-Training educators and health workers in the therapeutic use of music in the West Bank. In Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy (Vol. 11, No. 1).

Coombes, E., & Tombs-Katz, M. (2015). Interactive therapeutic music skill-sharing in the West Bank: An evaluation report of project Beit Sahour. Approaches: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Music Therapy, 9, 67-79.










Music Therapy Conversations - Prof Gary Ansdell

Professor Gary Ansdell has been a music therapist for thirty years, working mostly in the area of adult mental health in the last decade, and currently in late-life care settings. He has been involved in a wide range of areas of music therapy practice, and in developing the Community Music Therapy movement. Gary has also been active in training and research, developing new Masters and PhD programmes for Nordoff Robbins, where he was Director of Education (2008-15). He has published widely in the areas of music therapy and music and health and is author/co-author of seven books on music therapy, the latest of which include How Music Helps: In Music Therapy & Everyday Life (2014) and with Tia DeNora Musical Pathways in Recovery: Community Music Therapy & Mental Wellbeing (2016). His longterm collaboration with the music sociologist Tia DeNora has led to their joint editorship of the new book series Music and Change for Ashgate Publishers.

Gary currently works as an independent music therapy practitioner, consultant and scholar, and is an Associate of Nordoff Robbins, UK, where he is Convenor of the MPhil/PhD programme. He is also an honorary Professor in the department of sociology, philosophy and anthropology at Exeter University and Adjunct Professor in Music Therapy at the University of Limerick.

Gary talks about Mercédès Pavlicevic in this interview. He also talks about different approaches to music therapy, and we address some controversies, including Gary’s much discussed concept of the ‘consensus model’ in music therapy, and the perceived dichotomy between music-centred and psychodynamic music therapy.










Music Therapy Conversations - Julie Whelan

Julie has had extensive experience of senior roles in education, local authority services, government and the charity sector.

Her most recent roles were as founding CEO of the Dame Kelly Holmes Trust and in her seven years there she established the charity, it was recognised with a charity excellence award and it supported over 200,000 young people with mentoring programmes. 

She joined Nordoff Robbins in 2015 and since her arrival the charity has already met its overarching goal to increase by 100% the number of people it can support with its life-changing music therapy. Julie is now leading the trustees and executive team into the next strategic planning process for 2019 -2024.

In this interview Julie talks about some of the challenges she has faced in her new role, her personal perspectives on the music therapy profession, the importance of accountability, and lots more.










Music Therapy Conversations - Josephine Davies

In this episode of Music Therapy Conversations, Luke talks to Josephine Davies, a jazz saxophonist, composer, existential psychotherapist and lecturer. She studied classical and jazz at Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London, and more recently trained at Regent's University and the New School of Psychotherapy and Counselling. Though she is not a music therapist, Josephine is greatly interested in how therapies of all orientations can help people to access and express their creativity in their own unique ways. She is also deeply influenced by Japanese and Buddhist philosophies that celebrate the qualities of imperfection, impermanence and unity. Marrying these with various existential ideas underpins her view of the person, creative outlook, and more general lifestyle. 

You can still read Josephine's Facebook post, we we refer to during the podcast, and you can find more examples of her recorded work, as well as gig listings, on her website











Music Therapy Conversations - Daniel Thomas

In this episode of Music Therapy Conversations, Luke talks to Daniel Thomas about his process of moving from being a music therapist into running an arts therapy business. This includes an interesting discussion on the nature of 'brands', as well as reflections on how we communicate the subtle nuances for therapeutic work to other professionals. 

Daniel qualified as a music therapist in 2002. His past clinical work focused on children and families, especially supporting attachment, bonding and resilience. Daniel has worked in prisons, mental health settings and in special and mainstream schools with children with a range of brain injuries and other conditions. He certified in the APCI assessment in 2014, and as a Neurological Music Therapist in 2017. He is also the Joint Managing Director of Chroma

Daniel is passionate about the business of arts therapies, believing that the economics of therapy is as important an ethical issue for therapists as is the quality of their practice. Working with Dr. Vicky Abad, and colleagues from around the world including Aalborg University, Denmark and Lesley University, USA, Daniel co-authored and edited "The Economics of Therapy" published by JKP. 










Music Therapy Conversations - Dr. Helen Odell-Miller OBE

In episode 14 Luke's talks with Dr. Helen Odell-Miller OBE about music therapy and psychoanalysis, group work in adult mental health settings, research into music therapy and dementia, and many other things. 

Helen is Professor of Music Therapy, and Director of the Cambridge Institute for Music Therapy Research at Anglia University, Cambridge. Helen has lectured widely, and has been a keynote speaker at many national and international conferences in Europe, Australia, Asia and the USA. She has worked with parliament and the government advising on music therapy. Most recently she was one of the Commissioners for the Music and Dementia Strategy in the UK, produced by the International Longevity Centre UK, and launched at the House of Lords in January 2018: What would life be? Without a Song or Dance, What are We? 

Helen is co-editor and an author for the books Supervision of Music Therapy (Jessica Kingsley 2009), Forensic Music Therapy (Routledge 2013) and Collaboration and Assistance in Music Therapy Practice (2017). She has published widely in national and international peer reviewed journals and authored many book chapters. She is a pianist, violinist, and a singer in Cambridge Voices chamber choir. 

References: 

Odell-Miller, H., 2001. Music therapy and its relationship to psychoanalysis. Where analysis meets the arts, pp. 127-152. 

Wilson, S. ed., 2017, Music - Psychoanalysis - Musicology. Routledge. 










Music Therapy Conversations - Claire Flower

Episode 13 is Luke's interview with Claire Flower. Claire trained as a music therapist at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. Over the years she has worked in a wide range of settings, as well as running a supervision practice, teaching and examining. She currently works within the Music Therapy team in the Child Development Service at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital London, where she is joint team lead with Juliet Wood. At present, she is completing her doctoral studies at Nordoff-Robbins. Her practice-led study is an investigation of ways of working with children and parents in a healthcare context. 

References: 

Bortoft, H. (2012) Taking Appearances Seriously: The Dynamic Way of Seeing Goethe and European Thought. Edinburgh, Floris Books. 

Flower, C. (2014) Music therapy trios with child, parent and therapist: A preliminary qualitative single case study. Psychology of Music, 42(6), pp. 839-845. 


Blogs: 








Music Therapy Conversations - Becky White

In episode 12, which coincides with World Music Therapy Day, Luke Annesley talks to Becky White. Becky teaches clinical improvisation at the University of South Wales and works as an associate lecturer in music therapy at the University of the West of England. She is undertaking PhD research into learning experiences through improvisation of music and music therapy students. The study is arts based, employing qualitative phenomenological interviews combined with improvisations and transcribed with hand-drawn graphic scores. She is a member of the inter-modal and inter-disciplinary improvisation research network Concurrent, based at the University of Edinburgh.

During this interview Becky refers to a number of papers, including her recent Concurrent study on Voices, which is available here. She also references the following:

Ferrara, L. (1984) Phenomenology as a Tool for Musical Analysis. The Musical Quarterly, 70(3), pp. 355-373.

Wilson, G.B., and MacDonald, R.A. (2016) Musical choices during group free improvisation: A qualitative psychological investigation. Psychology of Music, 44(5), pp. 1029-1043.;












Music Therapy Conversations - BAMT AGM Round Table October 2017

Episode 11 of Music Therapy Conversations is the recording of the panel discussion from the BAMT AGM in October 2017. The panel members were Joy Gravestock, Anna Maratos, Simon Proctor, Alexia Quin and Ben Saul, bringing experience from freelance work, the third sector, and the NHS. The discussion, chaired by Luke Annesley, in front of an audience of BAMT members, encompassed rates of pay, surviving in the 'age of austerity', and communicating constructively with commissioners and funders. The audience participated fully in the developing conversation. 










Music Therapy Conversations - Dr. Stella Compton Dickinson

In episode 10 of Music Therapy Conversations, Luke talks to Dr. Stella Compton Dickinson about working in forensic settings. Stella is a London-based music therapist, professional oboist, lecturer, UK Council for Psychotherapy registered Cognitive Analytic therapist and accredited supervisor. She is author of The Clinician's Guide to Forensic Music Therapy and she has her own private practice and over twenty years of experience in the NHS as a clinician, Head of Arts Therapies and Clinical Research Lead. Her research was awarded the 2016 Ruskin Medal for the most impactful doctoral research. Stella's PhD thesis can be found here and you can link through to her website here











Music Therapy Conversations - Dean Beadle part 2 

In part 2 of Luke's conversation with Dean Beadle, Dean talks in some detail about his experiences of music therapy, going on to talk more generally about the importance of music in his life, both when he was growing up, and today, and ending with some helpful and inspiring advice for the UK music therapy profession.











Music Therapy Conversations - Dean Beadle

The release of this episode on November 15th, coincides with European Music Therapy Day. The focus this year is on 'Hearing Your Voice'. Appropriately, this is the first interview in this series with a music therapy service user. 
Dean Beadle has toured the UK for a number of years sharing his experiences of life as an autistic person. He has also spoken in Denmark, Belgium, Guernsey and Ireland, as well as undertaking four annual seminar tours of Australia and New Zealand. Through his humorous and insightful speeches, Dean outlines his positive outlook on his diagnosis. You can see a clip of Dean from 2011. Dean had music therapy as a child in south east London with music therapist, Judith Nockolds, which he talks about in part two of this interview, out next month. 

Part one has a focus on perception of autism, including Dean's own feelings about his diagnosis, and some of the challenges he faced as a child coming to terms with various aspects of his identity. He also draws interesting parallels between autism in a social context and other social issues, such as gay rights. 











Music Therapy Conversations - Anna Maratos

In the seventh episode of Music Therapy Conversations, Luke Annesley talks to Anna Maratos. Anna started her career as a music therapist in adult mental health in 1997, and gradually moved into increasingly senior management positions, culminating in her current post as Head of Arts Psychotherapies in Central and Northwest London NHS Foundation Trust. She talks about her changing strategy towards research, as well as instigating a move towards mentalisation based practice at CNWL. Anna delivered a keynote at the 2014 BAMT conference in Birmingham, in which she attempted to identify common ground between different theoretical perspectives towards music therapy. We discuss whether she still sees divisions within the UK profession, three years on. 











Music Therapy Conversations - Dr. Julian O'Kelly 

In the sixth episode of Music Therapy Conversations, Luke Annesley talks to Dr. Julian O'Kelly about his current research, as well as his doctoral studies at Aalborg University with people with severe head injuries. Julian has published widely on music therapy in palliative care and neuro-disability, and has now ventured in to mental health, co-ordinating a major NHS funded feasibility study with East London NHS Foundation Trust, on music therapy for chronic depression. 

There's the opportunity to hear Julian in person exploring the challenges and opportunities for music therapy offered by neuroscience in his forthcoming open lecture at the Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability on Thursday 14th September 2017, 4.30 - 5.30pm. Julian has also recently co-edited an e-book, that's free to download, on the same subject, which you can read here
The sixth episode of Music Therapy Conversations has landed this morning. In it, Luke Annesley talks to Dr. Julian O'Kelly his current research, as well as his doctoral studies at Aalborg University with people with severe head injuries. Julian has published widely on music therapy in palliative care and neuro-disability, and has now ventured in to mental health, co-ordinating a major NHS funded feasibility study with East London NHS Foundation Trust, on music therapy for chronic depression. 

There's the opportunity to hear Julian in person exploring the challenges and opportunities for music therapy offered by neuroscience in his forthcoming open lecture at the Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability on Thursday 14th September 2017, 4.30 - 5.30pm. Julian has also recently co-edited an e-book, that's free to download, on the same subject, which you can read here
The sixth episode of Music Therapy Conversations has landed this morning. In it, Luke Annesley talks to Dr. Julian O'Kelly his current research, as well as his doctoral studies at Aalborg University with people with severe head injuries. Julian has published widely on music therapy in palliative care and neuro-disability, and has now ventured in to mental health, co-ordinating a major NHS funded feasibility study with East London NHS Foundation Trust, on music therapy for chronic depression. 

There's the opportunity to hear Julian in person exploring the challenges and opportunities for music therapy offered by neuroscience in his forthcoming open lecture at the Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability on Thursday 14th September 2017, 4.30 - 5.30pm. Julian has also recently co-edited an e-book, that's free to download, on the same subject, which you can read here
The sixth episode of Music Therapy Conversations has landed this morning. In it, Luke Annesley talks to Dr. Julian O'Kelly his current research, as well as his doctoral studies at Aalborg University with people with severe head injuries. Julian has published widely on music therapy in palliative care and neuro-disability, and has now ventured in to mental health, co-ordinating a major NHS funded feasibility study with East London NHS Foundation Trust, on music therapy for chronic depression. 

There's the opportunity to hear Julian in person exploring the challenges and opportunities for music therapy offered by neuroscience in his forthcoming open lecture at the Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability on Thursday 14th September 2017, 4.30 - 5.30pm. Julian has also recently co-edited an e-book, that's free to download, on the same subject, which you can read here












Music Therapy Conversations -
Prof. Mercédès Pavlicevic

In the fifth episode of Music Therapy Conversations, Luke Annesley talks to Prof. Mercédès Pavlicevic, author of many important music therapy texts and Chair of the Scientific Committee for the BAMT 2016 conference. Mercédès talks about how the music therapist relates to their environment, including social and political contexts, and possible future directions for the profession. She also talks about research, including her own relationship to empirical positivist approaches, and how research can, and perhaps should, grow out of practice. 





Luke Annesley talks to Mercedes Pavlicevic, author of many important music therapy texts and Head of the Scientific Committee for the BAMT 2016 conference. Mercedes talks about how the music therapist relates to their environment, including social and political contexts, and possible future directions for the profession. She also talks about research, including her own relationship to empirical positivist approaches, and how research can, and perhaps should, grow out of practice. 
Luke Annesley talks to Mercedes Pavlicevic, author of many important music therapy texts and Head of the Scientific Committee for the BAMT 2016 conference. Mercedes talks about how the music therapist relates to their environment, including social and political contexts, and possible future directions for the profession. She also talks about research, including her own relationship to empirical positivist approaches, and how research can, and perhaps should, grow out of practice. 








Music Therapy Conversations - Auriel Warwick

In the fourth episode of Music Therapy Conversations, Luke Annesley talks to Auriel Warwick about her substantial experience of working with children with a diagnosis of autistic spectrum disorder, as well as about the challenges of working in schools, and how to communicate effectively with other professionals about music therapy. But before that, she describes her very first encounter with pioneering music therapist, Juliette Alvin...









Music Therapy Conversations - Dr. Catherine Carr

In the third episode of Music Therapy Conversations, Luke Annesley talks to Dr. Catherine Carr about music therapy research in general, and some of her own research in adult mental health in particular. They discuss the relationship between training and research, as well as some of the challenges that the music therapy researcher faces. Is research inevitably reductive, or are there ways of doing research in music therapy which meet the requirements of evidence-based practice, whilst also capturing the essential details of the work? Perhaps, most importantly, what can and should clinicians do to stay up to date with the latest research developments? 











Music Therapy Conversations - Prof. Leslie Bunt

In the second episode of Music Therapy Conversations, Luke Annesley talks to Leslie Bunt, Professor of Music Therapy at the University of the West of England, author, clinician, and trainer and supervisor in Guided Imagery in Music (GIM), about integrative approaches to music therapy, the inherent risks in clinical work, and liminality. 












Music Therapy Conversations - Dr. Rachel Darnley-Smith

In the first episode of this new podcast series from BAMT, trustee Luke Annesley, is joined in conversation by Dr. Rachel Darnley-Smith, music therapist, researcher and lecturer, to discuss all things music therapy.