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24 September 2018
HCPC launches consultation on changes to registration fees
The Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) has today launched a consultation on proposals to increase the registration fees it charges.

In the consultation, we are proposing an increase in the renewal fee from £90 to £106 per year, with a similar level of increases to the other fees we charge.

The increases are needed to support our new strategic focus of promoting professionalism and preventing fitness to practise issues from arising. We also need to continue to invest in the services we offer to registrants. The consultation takes place in the context of keeping pace with the cost of inflation and the impact on our operations and income when social workers in England transfer to Social Work England in 2019.

As an independent regulator, we are self-financing with our operating costs funded entirely by the professionals on our Register. We do not receive any regular funding from the Government and we do not hold large reserves.

Marc Seale, HCPC’s Chief Executive and Registrar said:

“The revenue we generate from our registrant fees will ensure we can significantly increase our efforts towards preventing problems rather than taking action afterwards. It will also enable us to provide up to date services through the use innovation and technology.

“The consultation sets out where the registrants’ fees are spent and why the increases are needed. It highlights how these increases compare to our existing fees and provides information on our financial performance, including the efficiencies we have already made. It also shows how the proposed increases compare with other regulators. If adopted, we would continue to have the lowest renewal fee of all the health and care regulators overseen by the Professional Standards Authority (PSA).”

The consultation will close on Friday 14 December 2018.

If the proposals are adopted the changes would be effective from 1 October 2019. Existing registrants would pay the new renewal fee when their profession next renews its registration.

Social workers in England will be moving to a new regulator next year. If there is no change to this, these proposals will not affect them. However, in order to continue practising, they must renew their registration with us between 1 September and 30 November 2018.

For further information please contact Anna Hill in HCPC’s press office on 020 7840 9806 or email 
press@hcpc-uk.org

Notes to editors

1. To find out more about the proposed fees consultation and to take part visit http://www.hcpc-uk.org/aboutus/consultations/

2. The Health and Care Professions Council is an independent regulator set up by the Health and Social Work Professions Order 2001. The HCPC keeps a register for 16 different health and care professions and only registers people who meet the standards it sets for their training, professional skills, behaviour and health. The HCPC will take action against professionals who do not meet these standards or who use a protected title illegally.

3. The HCPC currently regulates the following 16 professions. Each of these professions has one or more ‘protected titles’. Anyone who uses one of these titles must register with the HCPC. To see the full list of protected titles please see www.hcpc-uk.org/aboutregistration/protectedtitles

Arts therapists

Biomedical scientists

Chiropodists / podiatrists

Clinical scientists

Dietitians

Hearing aid dispensers

Occupational therapists

Operating department practitioners

Orthoptists

Paramedics

Physiotherapists

Practitioner psychologists

Prosthetists / orthotists

Radiographers

Social workers in England

Speech and language therapists

4. Social workers in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are separately regulated in those countries and are unaffected by these proposals

5. To contact us via social media, use the Twitter handle @The_HCPC or search The Health and Care Professions Council on Facebook or LinkedIn.